A Solar Array the Size of a Football Field is Being Built in the Centre of Prague

The construction of the largest solar array in the centre of Prague has commenced at the Prague Congress Centre.

A total of 2,080 solar panels will be erected on an area of 7,000 square metres, which will save the Prague Congress Centre CZK 5.5 million a year in electricity costs.

The solar power plant will be an addition to one of the largest energy savings projects in the Czech Republic, which is being implemented in the PCC by ENESA, a subsidiary of ČEZ ESCO. The project has already saved the centre CZK 32 million this year.

“We have recently observed a clear trend in Czech companies and public institutions: reducing energy costs goes hand in hand with consistent decarbonisation and efforts to operate in a more sustainable fashion. Our task at ČEZ is to assist with this as much as possible. The largest solar array in the centre of Prague will add to one of the largest energy savings projects in the Czech Republic and will increase the annual savings of the Prague Congress Centre by more than 5 million,” said Daniel Beneš, CEO of ČEZ.

Photovoltaics for CZK 1

PCC will use ČEZ ESCO’s innovative model called “Photovoltaics for CZK 1”. PCC will thus acquire a power plant with an installed capacity of 936 kWp without any investment costs.

The costs of the project will be borne by the supplier ČEZ ESCO, which will build the photovoltaic plant for the customer and subsequently operate it. PCC will repay the investment in the price of the electricity consumed. At the end of the 13-year contract, the Prague Congress Centre will buy the PV plant for just one CZK and will continue to generate its own energy.

Building a photovoltaic power plant in the centre of Prague and with dimensions larger than a football field is not a simple matter. For example, the designers had to prove by testing a sample of panels placed on the roof that the sun’s rays falling on their surface would not dazzle not only the surrounding area, but also, for example, visitors to the Petřín lookout tower several kilometers away.

Despite these obstacles, the pace of installation is fast – just over half a year will separate the start of design preparations and the placement of the last panel.

The power plant is expected to start up as early as next spring.

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